Comino

Comino

Is the smallest inhabited island of the Maltese archipelago. Situated in the channel between the island of Malta and Gozo, Comino measures 3.5 kilometres squared with a permanent population of three people.
Comino has been inhabited by farmers since the Roman times but the island has always been popular with pirates hiding or taking refuge in one of the caves and coves situated around the island. In one of the bays, an amphorae used for burials, with a body discovered inside, was discovered. Today, it is exhibited at the Museum of Archaeology in the Citadel, Gozo.
At the end of the 13th century, Abraham Abulafia was exiled on Comino. He composed two important books, ‘Sefer ha-ot’ (The Book of Sign) and ‘Imer Shefer’ (Words of Beauty).
Defending the bay of Comino, the Knights of St John built St Mary’s tower. Built in the 17th century, it greatly improved communication between Malta and Gozo and formed part of a chain of watch towers which were built by the Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt.
The Knights continued to defend the island in the beginning of the 18th century by building St Mary’s battery. It’s a semicircular structure with a number of cannons facing the sea.
Between the island of Comino and the islet of Cominotto, lies the Blue Lagoon. With its crystal clear blue sea and white sandy sea bed, it becomes very popular with swimmers, divers, sailing yachts and power boats during the summer period.
On the other side of the Blue Lagoon there is a sandy beach called Santa Marija and a small hotel, Comino Hotel.
To reach Comino there are small ferries that leaves from Marfa and Cirkewwa terminal in Malt and from Mgarr harbour in Gozo. The trip takes only five minutes and they leave every half an hour.